For the city's sea turtles, survival still hangs in the balance

The green turtles of Sydney Harbour tell a tale of two cities.

That these endangered reptiles regularly visit to graze on seagrass meadows in the middle of a big city, and some have even made the harbour their home, attests to the improving health of Sydney’s main waterway.

This week, the Herald delves into the state of our harbour, and its changing life both above and below the waterline.
A Lord Howe Island Marine Park ranger releases a green turtle from Taronga Zoo.

A Lord Howe Island Marine Park ranger releases a green turtle from Taronga Zoo. Photo: James Woodford

The turtles – with the mussels that crowd on to channel markers and the seahorses that wrap themselves around shark nets – are a good sign the estuary is becoming cleaner.

Yet for a 13-year-old sea scout, Julia Spragg, her first encounter with a green turtle was far from a good experience.

With one flipper entangled in fishing line that had cut to the bone, another flipper severed, and deep tackle wounds to its neck, the animal had little chance of survival.

Read full story HERE.

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About Candace M Hansen

Wildlife advocate, conservationist and environmentalist.
This entry was posted in Turtles & Tortoises. Bookmark the permalink.

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