Salamanders: The real first sign of spring (though you might not see them)

Every year, as winter finally begins to relax its hold on our environment, we anxiously look for the first signs of spring. Some of us search for songbirds returning from the south; others watch for the earliest wildflowers emerging in the forests.

A few, including me, venture out on the first mild, rainy nights in March to witness an annual event that has been carried out for thousands, if not millions, of years in the northern climates — the migration of amphibians from the woodlands to the wetlands.

In the Poconos, several species of frogs and salamanders perform this ancient ritual and deposit their egg masses in the water at night, only to re-emerge onto the land and return to the woods just a few days later.

Read full story HERE.

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About Candace M Hansen

Wildlife advocate, conservationist and environmentalist.
This entry was posted in Amphibians. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Salamanders: The real first sign of spring (though you might not see them)

  1. JD Hartzel says:

    Ive seen spotted salamanders migrate to breeding sites great thing to see in nature

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